Tag Archives: Blended learning

Using the virtual classroom system to teach a traditional girls’ classroom: benefits & challenges

This paper focuses on fulltime girls students’ perspectives of using the virtual classroom (via the Blackboard system) as a main teaching tool to deliver and teach learning materials. It also presents teachers’ views on using this system in comparison with the videoconference system used by male faculty staff members to teach female students at their campuses. (…)

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Instructional delivery utilizing a blended format

Current trends in technology and new strategies in curriculum design have yielded a new methodology for content area course delivery. Blended learning is now being utilized in many colleges and universities to deliver instruction with a balanced approach in mind. This format provides new avenues in curriculum design and instructional delivery. Blended learning unites the best of both worlds in a post-secondary instructional model.

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Quality experiences of inquiry in blended contexts: university student approaches to inquiry, technologies, and conceptions of learning

Evaluating the quality of inquiry using technology in blended contexts at university is a complex phenomenon as there are many variables which could account for qualitative variation in the experience. This study looks at reasons for qualitative variation in the university student experience of inquiry using technologies. It considers approaches to inquiry and technologies, conceptions of learning and academic achievement. The results identify which aspects of the experience account for relatively more successful learning and which aspects of the experience tend to be related to less successful experiences. It offers a nuanced understanding of the contribution of technology to successful experiences. The results have implications for the design of activities which involve class and on-line contexts and the way we help students to be successful.

Article first published in “Australasian Technology”, V. 30 (2014), n. 3, http://ascilite.org/ajet/submission/index.php/AJET/issue/view/78 Reprinted with permission.

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B-learning quality: dimensions, criteria and pedagogical approach

Measuring the quality of a b-learning environment is critical to determine the success of a b-learning course. Several initiatives have been recently conducted on benchmarking and quality in e-learning. Despite these efforts in defining and examining quality issues concerning online courses, a defining instrument to evaluate quality is one of the key challenges for blended learning, since it incorporates both traditional and online instruction methods.

Article first published in “EURODL”, 2014, n. 1 (Brief items) as open access article. Reprinted with permission.

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Innovación utilizando las TICs para el aprendizaje combinado. La pertinencia de una propuesta de blended learning en la universidad

A 3-year long non-conventional teaching and learning experience was undertaken, with technical support by CTER-Curriculum, Technology, and Education Reform Centre from the University of Illinois, USA – directed by Dr. Thomas H. Anderson – and technical assistance by Lic. Norma Scagnoli, in order to adjust ICT technologies to our local university context, respecting the students’ socio-cultural features and origins. At the same time, a research action was performed, so as to establish the pros and cons of the implementation, from the points of view of academic improvement, social interaction and pedagogical interactivity. The findings, further elaborated, will contribute to realize such local adjustments, also considering their possible application to other experiences, which might be undertaken with the aim of pursuing instructional innovation in Higher Education.

Original article received: 7 May 2008; Revised 15 May 2008.

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Global learning through collaboration

Inter-campus, international cooperation online is the future of learning. I begin by showing the importance of online and blended learning. Then, I present three best practices: online collaboration between University of Illinois and Warsaw School of Economics, that started in 2006; Polish Consortium (Econet) of top economic academies, offering one certificate, based on five courses, offered by those five institutions; finally, an international project in computers and philosophy, coordinated by professors from Sweden, USA, Italy, and Greece, aimed at setting up the standards in this new and growing field. I also sketch out an idea of a worldwide academy, and what such a global program may look like.

Original article received: 18 February 2008; Revised: 15 May 2008.

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