Tag Archives: Case study

Cogent: a case study of meaningful gamification in education with virtual currency

This paper analyzes students’ experience with Cogent, a virtual economy system used throughout the 4 years of a B.S. degree in a Technology major. The case study explains the rules of the Cogent system and investigates its effectiveness to motivate students to learn. Using focus groups and interviews, we collected qualitative data from students about their experience and perceptions of Cogent. The results indicate that Cogent played an encouraging and motivational role for these students and suggest potential for the successful design and implementation of meaningful gamification systems to promote student motivation and engagement within an educational context. (…)

Article first published in “iJET – International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning”, V. 10 (2015), n. 1, as open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/at/deed.en)
http://online-journals.org/index.php/i-jet/article/view/4247

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Analytical study on online communication tools within elearning systems

Any eLearning Management System (e-LMS) contains electronic content and many tools that are needed for running an efficient electronic management system. Some of these are related to electronic communications. Arab Open University (AOU) is one of the first organizations that used e-learning systems in the Arabic region. We present in this paper an analytical study on the effectiveness of using electronic communications within e-learning environments. This analytical study will differentiate between the synchronous and asynchronous communications in e-learning. We will focus on the most used tools in e-LMS such as Messages, Forums, and Chat Session as a part of electronic communications within the learning management system. Experimental results on AOU experience of using different types on electronic communication are presented.

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A Study of Four Textbook Distribution Models

Which manual distribution model would you choose among, the purchase of printed books, the renting of printed books, the renting of texts in electronic format and the renting of texts in electronic format with their respective reading devices?

The question is crucial for every university that today must decide whether to move to e-books, keep paper books or prefer intermediary and gradual solutions. Daytona State College’s pilot project which investigated it for two years (2009-2011) tried to answer it through the different experiences, reactions and opinions of students and university staff in relation to the four proposed models.

Article first published in “EDUCAUSE review online”, December 2011, as open access article, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

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El uso de experimentos como método de aprendizaje activo en cursos de iniciación a la Economía

The economy has long been considered an antithetical discipline to experiments, making it a stranger to the laboratory, the place of excellence for didactic experiments and research; it has therefore, until now, remained the undisputed and exclusive domain of theoretical tools and of the classical lecture.

Article first published in “@tic. revista d’innovació educativa”, n .8, 2012, pp. 26-32 as open access article, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Video-based Supplemental Instruction: creating opportunities for at-risk students undertaking Engineering Mathematics

Video Based Supplemental Instruction (VSI) provides students with an intensive learning experience that aims to help them succeed in a subject which they have previously failed. The program, which has proved successful in similar contexts, was piloted at the University of Western Sydney in an engineering mathematics subject with a high failure rate. Students face difficulty with this subject for a number of reasons, including lack of preparedness and lack of confidence or positive attitude towards mathematics. Consequently students tend to fall behind as the subject progresses and are therefore unable to complete assessments and the exam. This paper provides a case study of the VSI pilot and outlines the methodology of utilising pre-recorded lectures which are the primary VSI learning tool. It describes the outcomes for the attendees who had previously failed this demanding first year subject as well as the insights gained by the staff involved in this collaborative learning program.

Article first published in “Journal of Peer Learning”, V. 4 (2011), n. 1, © Lyn Armstrong, Clare Power, Carmel Coady, Lynette Dormer (2011). Reprinted with permission.

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Effects of the tutor and of the recovery period on exchange dynamics in the forums of an e-learning course

A very important aspect of the ‘collaborative’ learning model is the interaction in the discussion Forum within e-learning platforms. Actually in this space participants can send their contributions (posts) thus solving their problems and questions, they express comments and increase their knowledge through their personal experiences (constructivist model). The figure that plays a major role in this area is the tutor who acts as the animator and facilitator of group interactive processes. This paper reports on the outcome of a quantitative analysis on the influence of tutor´s activity and ‘recovery periods’ on exchange dynamics in the forums of participants within a case study of a two-month e-learning course organised by MAIB.

Received: 22 October 2010
Revised: 17 November 2010

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Culturally-responsive mathematics pedagogy through complexivist thinking

This paper uses a complexity lens to consider the pedagogical project of culturally responsive mathematics. Need for new and different theoretical perspectives for Aboriginal education arise from chronic underachievement among Canada’s Aboriginal students. Culturally responsive mathematics pedagogy as a complex learning system allows a different view into the interrelationships and necessary conditions between culture, education and society, a view that aims to open new possibility for curriculum development, Aboriginal schooling and cultural renewal, while ensuring success for students.

As part of the $11 million school project, the Band School Society negotiated with the Federal Aboriginal Affairs Ministry and the building contractors to include apprenticeships for Band members to join the work crew hired to build the new school. For an Aboriginal village of 2000 people and up to 80% unemployment, this was a great opportunity. Interested workers were invited to apply for the positions. All 15 of the respondents were hired immediately, and all needed mathematics upgrading courses to enter the apprenticeship training program. Skilled trades workers were in short supply in the community, and so future employment opportunities were virtually assured after completion of the school project. A local, non-Native adult education teacher was enlisted to run an evening prep course for these newly hired apprentices. The course offered focused training in mathematics skills needed by trades people, and indeed, these were prerequisite skills for entering the apprenticeship program. On the first night of class, eleven men and women arrived. By week two, the group had dwindled to six. When the course was completed at the end of eight weeks, two students earned completion certificates and formally entered the apprenticeship program.

Article originally published in ‘Complicity:  An International Journal of Complexity and Education’, V. 5 (2008), n. 1  pp. 33-47, http://www.complexityandeducation.ualberta.ca/journal.htm

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Innovación utilizando las TICs para el aprendizaje combinado. La pertinencia de una propuesta de blended learning en la universidad

A 3-year long non-conventional teaching and learning experience was undertaken, with technical support by CTER-Curriculum, Technology, and Education Reform Centre from the University of Illinois, USA – directed by Dr. Thomas H. Anderson – and technical assistance by Lic. Norma Scagnoli, in order to adjust ICT technologies to our local university context, respecting the students’ socio-cultural features and origins. At the same time, a research action was performed, so as to establish the pros and cons of the implementation, from the points of view of academic improvement, social interaction and pedagogical interactivity. The findings, further elaborated, will contribute to realize such local adjustments, also considering their possible application to other experiences, which might be undertaken with the aim of pursuing instructional innovation in Higher Education.

Original article received: 7 May 2008; Revised 15 May 2008.

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Research on learners preferences for reading from a printed text or from a computer screen

In this study, 254 Royal Roads University School of Business learners (graduates and undergraduates) were surveyed on their online course-related reading habits and choices. Based on their responses and anecdotal comments and the data from follow-up interviews with six of the participants, learners preferred print copies of text materials for reasons of portability, dependability, flexibility, and ergonomics. Recommendations include providing an option in all online courses to print electronic text files in a format suitable for reading from paper. Further research is proposed on the effect of extended time spent in front of a computer screen on learners’ preference for reading from paper.

Article originally appeared in: “Journal of distance education – Revue de l’éducation à distance”, V. 21(2006), n. 1, pp. 33-50

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Open Source 2010: reflections on 2007

Much has happened since the 2004 prognostications of my EDUCAUSE Review article “Open Source 2007: How Did This Happen?” (Wheeler, 2004). The article peered into the future through the lens of two possible outcomes for open-source application software by 2007. In the first scenario, higher education and commercial firms overcame many challenges to evolve a new “community source” model for developing and sustaining enterprise-scale, quality software. In the second scenario, the obstacles for collaboration and coordination of investments were simply too great: institutions could not find ways to agree. The article thesis asserted that the actual outcome for 2007 would reflect the collective actions of colleges and universities. For those of us in higher education, it was our outcome to choose …

Article originally appeared in: “EDUCAUSE Review”, V. 42(2007), n. 1, pp. 48-67

A Case Study in Integrating the Best Practices of Face-to-Face Art History and Online Teaching

Distance learning courses have for the most part made use of simple structures that focus on the juxtaposition of html texts with static visuals. Instruction in art history demands more. It requires a type of interaction described as performative triangulation, which naturally occurs in traditional art history face-to-face lecture courses. The authors contend that this type of performative triangle model, which consists of interaction between the audience, speaker, and image, is possible in an online art history course if animated interactive activities are provided to engage students in linking texts and images. This paper presents data from two studies conducted on interactive animations in an online art appreciation course. The first study compares student learning of identical content in a face-to-face lecture without an interactive component, a face-to-face lecture augmented by an animated interactions, and an html content module also augmented by an animated interactive. The data from this study suggests that learning occurred just as well, if not better, among students provided with the animated interactives as among students offered only the face-to-face lecture. The second study considers student perceptions of the animated interactions and assesses whether students believe that they learn from these tools. This data suggests that students view the animated interactions as assets to the learning experience.

Article originally appeared in: “Interactive Multimedia Electronic Journal of Computer Enhanced Learning”, V. 7, n. 1, 2005. Republished with permission.

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