Tag Archives: Virtual worlds

Collaborative learning and 3D virtual worlds: two experiences in a new didactic perspective

Nowadays teachers and trainers pay attention to the research and the experimentation of innovative pedagogical tools and approaches, such as simulation and 3D virtual world in order to improve the learning capacity of their students. Sometimes they invest time and financial resources to manage their updating courses, especially about how new technological potentialities can be exploited and integrated into their mainstream teaching methods. Also the use of different learning environments apart from the traditional class can stimulate the learning processes creating more educational opportunities and favoring the development of other approaches, such as collaborative learning.

This type of learning approach is represented by a situation where two or more individuals learn or try to learn something together aimed to the building of a common knowledge. Unlike the individual learning, people engage themselves in a collaborative learning process in order to capitalize on each other’s resources and competences. More specifically, the collaborative learning model is based on knowledge that can be constructed within a community in which members interact actively through sharing experiences and assuming asymmetric roles. In other terms, the collaborative learning refers to methodologies and specific environments where the students engage in a common task in which each individual depends on each other and is responsible for the others.

This article intends to describe two different practical experiences derived from TALETE and AVATAR projects on the use of 3D virtual worlds as learning environments to facilitate the collaborative learning among students.

Received: 6 May 2015
Revised: 15 May 2015

View full article in PDF

Virtual worlds in education: AVATAR, ST.ART and Euroversity action-research initiatives

This paper gives an overview of the educational potential of virtual worlds and draws on the results of the AVATAR  ‘Added value of teaching in a virtual world’, the ST.ART ‘Street Artists in a virtual space’ and the Euroversity projects, all funded with support by the European Commission under the Lifelong Learning Programme. These action-research projects deal with the technological, pedagogical, cultural and motivational benefits of using virtual worlds in educational settings and provide a framework for the implementation of virtual worlds in education.

View full Article in PDF

From technology to relationships: the evolving profile of virtual laboratories

The increasing integration between humans and technology, the multiplying interaction modalities, the enhancement of realism, presence and immersivity; the opening to soft sciences and to new multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary fields; the relationships and cooperation element coming to the fore: these are the key issues of the huge ‘scientific research potential of virtual worlds’, as the title of a well-known Science article stated (Bainbridge, 2007). And these are also the core peculiarities of virtual laboratories of today.

Received: 16 May 2012
Revised: 3 June 2012

View full Article in PDF

Experiences of operating and studying in Second Life: conclusions for training design

The Educational Association Citizens´ Forum SKAF ry is an educational institution for non-formal education. The Citizens’ Forum has been an active Second Life participant since 2007, researching its potential and challenges in educational use and non-governmental organisation activities. The first training sessions were organised in 2008 on a block of land rented from EduFinland I island. Later, ownership was acquired of the Suomi ry (Finland ry) island, which was customised to serve Finnish organisations and non-governmental organisations (further NGO). The Citizens’ Forum’s training courses have covered training in Second Life and the organisation of cooperative meetings and various other events in Second Life. The overall length of training sessions has been one month. Each course has consisted of 3-5. 1.5 hour meetings in Second Life and interim tasks completed either individually or in small groups. In addition to Second Life, Moodle, an online learning environment, has been employed in which tasks, experiences and feedback have been gathered and which has also contained written summaries of what was learned during the Second Life meetings. The Second Life environment has also been regularly utilised in Citizens’ Forum staff and various other work group work related meetings.Funding and ventures 2008: Ministry of Education special funding, Initiation of Second Life courses and construction of environment 2009-2010: ESF programme Open Learning Environments-AVO venture, development and implementation of Second Life educational programmes. This article is based on practical experiences gained from:
- suitability of cooperative educational processes for Second Life
- constructing a Second Life environment for educational use
- suitability of Second Life technology and tools for education and team work
- practical methods related to educational situations.

Article first published in “Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education TOJDE”, V. 12 (2011), n. 3-2, Special Issue on Second Life Applications in Distance Education, Article 3. Reprinted with permission.

https://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr/tojde43-2/articles/article_3.htm

View full Article in PDF

Visual metaphors in virtual worlds. The example of NANEC 2010/2011

Before the invention of printing, the storytelling was the grat transmitter of knowledge. The print brought speed and continuity to narrative, extending the time for its reflection. With Internet the sequentiality of the message is fragmented and new realities may be created, with reference in the real world or not. Virtual worlds are a clear example.

Article first published in “@tic Revista d´innovació educativa”, January-June 2011, pp. 38-45, as open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence. Reprinted with permission.

http://ojs.uv.es/index.php/attic/article/view/339

View full Article in PDF